Joshua Gizelt (swashbuckler332) wrote,
Joshua Gizelt
swashbuckler332

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Priori Incantatem

While they are an imperfect reflection at best of J.K. Rowling's iconic series, a lot of credit has to go to everybody involved in the Harry Potter film franchise for not only having stayed the course throughout, but with such a generally consistent level of quality. Just as the characters grow up over the course of the books, so did we see their cinematic incarnations mature over the course of eight films over eleven years.

As does the film series itself, so too has the music evolved.

…JOHN WILLIAMS…

My primary interest in the 2001 theatrical release of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (as it was titled in the United States) was John Williams' score. I really enjoyed the music, highly melodic and bursting with different themes and motives, and while there are a few moments in the film that I consider overscored, I think that this is more an element of Chris Columbus' kitchen-sink approach to the film than anything else. I would otherwise compare his first Harry Potter score to Superman, and there is no question that, like Williams' contribution to the musical legacy of the Man of Steel, Hedwig's theme would be associated with the character for a long time to come.

I found Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, the first sequel, a bit more enjoyable (enough to send me to reading the books). Unfortunately, while Williams wrote a myriad of new themes and cues, other projects prevented him from fully scoring the film, and William Ross was brought in to arrange music from the first film to fill in the blanks. While this was quite well-executed, this meant that the first sequel, which does have quite a few very entertaining moments, it never develops its own discrete identity, and acts mostly as an extension onto the first film's score.

Williams returned to fully score the third film in the series, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, a sharp revision of the franchise by director Alfonso Cuarón. Surprisingly, Williams eschewed all of his original thematic material except Hedwig's theme (aside from a brief quote of his "Nimbus 2000" theme at the very end for Harry's test-flight of his Firebolt), instead building a completely original score incorporating Medieval period instruments into the orchestration to emphasize the antiquity of Hogwarts. This very different approach gives the film a unique flavor in the franchise, and on a meta level, ended up setting the stage for his departure from the series.

…AND BEYOND…

Shortly after the release of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, it became apparent that John Williams would not be able to score the next film in the franchise. Patrick Doyle had provided notable scores for Into the West and Donnie Brasco for director Mike Newell. Although he incorporated Hedwig's theme into the score, Doyle didn't try to emulate Williams, instead choosing an unabashedly romantic approach, with an appropriately British flavor and spectacular action scenes. Doyle's score is the most classically styled of the franchise, emphasizing the more traditional style Newell brought to the franchise. While Doyle is the only composer to have worked on only one film in the series, the score he provided is an excellent stand-alone work, and I was pleased to find the recording sessions while preparing this compilation.

Director David Yates brought on board his collaborator Nicholas Hooper for Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, who, despite referencing Hedwig's theme, moved away from a thematic idiom into one that is more minimalistic (in the repeating musical cells sense) and textural. I wasn't particularly taken with this score when the film first came out (an impression no doubt aided by the completely haphazard programming of the music on the album), but I have since warmed up to it quite a bit; Hooper develops several motives that would become more prominent in his sequel, and give this score a greater weight in context of the series. One of my favorite cues in the film the Scottish variation of the friends theme heard as Harry rushes toward Hagrid's cottage, doesn't appear on the album.

Because I wasn't really thrilled with the fifth film's score, I wasn't expecting much from Hooper's follow-up Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. I was therefore quite pleasantly surprised to find that I rather enjoyed the score both in context of the film and on the album; I felt that Hooper's sense for the characters was more focused and thematically driven, with his theme for Dumbledore standing out as being an excellent match for the character. Hooper builds on his material from Order of the Phoenix in quite interesting and engaging ways; the Possession theme from the previous score forming not only the basis for the climax of the film, but also shows up quite chillingly right after Harry casts Sectum Sempra on Draco, which is quite appropriate as that is the moment when Harry is most like Tom Riddle (another cue sadly absent from the film's album).

Hooper chose not to return for the two-part adaptation of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Alexandre Desplat was tapped to complete the series, and his scores are an interesting blend of both thematic and textural writing, ranging from quiet, intimate moments to raging blood and thunder when appropriate. Rather than quoting Hedwig's theme at key moments as both Doyle and Hooper would do in their scores, Desplat tends to integrate it into the cues, often broken or re-arranged, along with the myriad of other themes he authored for his two films, of which there are many, with many variations. Despite all of these themes and motives, Desplat also engages in quite a lot of theme-sharing, a technique often employed by Ennio Morricone. He creates a heroic theme for the Order of the Phoenix that is eventually passed on to Dumbledore's Army; it also doubles as a love theme for Harry and Ginny. There is also a theme for the trio's quest to find and destroy the Horcruxes that doubles as Ron and Hermione's love theme. There is also a menacing theme for the Death Eaters in Part 1 and an arresting theme for Lily Potter in Part 2 as well as numerous contemplative passages. Desplat sent the movie series off in style.


…SO NOW THEN…

John Williams' contribution to the franchise was the subject of my Lumos Musica! compilation (which will be revised the millisecond I find the recording sessions for Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, I'm all set with the other two). As the film series continued to unfold, I didn't know whether or not a mix was feasible. I recently re-watched the movies and started getting some ideas for how to put together a follow-up album concentrating on the fourth through eighth films, years four through seven. While this disc would supplement that one (the title and cover art is designed to be the "after" for the "before" of the Lumos Musica! cover art), it would not be subject to the same structure (that is, reflecting the stories themselves), instead having a more free-form, purely musical approach. This disc is more representative than explorative, as some of my others are (including Lumos Musica).

Mixes like these are interesting illustrations of how different composers can approach similar subject material. Each of the represented composers worked in their own particular style, but the tracks tend to mix well together because they are all for the same franchise, with certain requirements thereof. I often found myself creating small sequences in which different composers were scoring similar scenes in their respective films, and ended up with a very cohesive result.



37 Tracks • 83:27


  1. FOREIGN VISITORS ARRIVE 1:28
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle incorporating “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)

  2. POLYJUICE POTION 2:03
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2010 — Alexandre Desplat incorporating “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)

  3. DUMBLEDORE'S ARMY 2:37
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

  4. SNAPE TO MALFOY MANOR 1:54
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2010 — Alexandre Desplat)

  5. SLUGHORN'S CONFESSION 3:26
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

  6. GOLDEN EGG 4:47
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

  7. DUMBLEDORE'S SPEECH 1:29
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper · Lyrics by Steve Kloves)

  8. LILY'S THEME 2:05
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat)

  9. LOVELY LADIES OF BEAUXBATONS 1:15
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

  10. PROFESSOR UMBRIDGE 1:09
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

  11. AT THE BURROW 2:07
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2010 — Alexandre Desplat)

  12. DEATH EATERS IN LONDON 1:22
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

  13. NEVILLE'S WALTZ 2:05
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

  14. THE FLIGHT OF THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX 1:25
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

  15. OBLIVIATE 2:24
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2010: Alexandre Desplat)

  16. HARRY IN WINTER 2:51
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

  17. HARRY AND HERMIONE 2:53
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

  18. DRAGON FLIGHT 1:38
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat incorporating “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)

  19. BENEATH THE BLACK LAKE 4:25
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

  20. FAREWELL ARAGOG 2:00
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

  21. IN THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS 1:28
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat incorporating “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)

  22. WHEN GINNY KISSED HARRY 2:29
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

  23. HARRY AND GINNY 1:38
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2010 — Alexandre Desplat)

  24. RON'S VICTORY 1:39
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper incorporating “Quidditch, Third Year” by John Williams)

  25. MYRTLE'S MOVE 0:54
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

  26. THE MINISTRY OF MAGIC 2:36
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

  27. RON'S SPEECH 2:11
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2010 — Alexandre Desplat)

  28. IN NOCTEM 1:55
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Price · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper · Lyrics by Steve Kloves)

  29. STATUES 1:43
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat)

  30. ARCHWAY DUEL 1:30
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

  31. DEATH OF CEDRIC 1:43
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

  32. POSSESSION 2:36
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

  33. VOLDEMORT 6:50
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

  34. TOM RIDDLE'S LAST STAND 4:08
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat incorporating “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)

  35. DUMBLEDORE'S FAREWELL 2:19
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

  36. A NEW BEGINNING 1:32
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat)

  37. OWL POST 0:32
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle adapted from “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)


HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE
(2005)

Music Composed by Patrick Doyle

Orchestrated by Patrick Doyle, James Shearman and Lawrence Ashmore
Performed by the London Symphony Orchestra
Conducted by James Shearman

Produced by Patrick Doyle and Maggie Rodford
Recorded and Mixed by Nick Wollage
Recorded at Air Lyndhurst Studios and Air Edel Recording Studios
Mixed at Air Lyndhurst Studios



HARRY POTTER AND THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX
(2007)

Music Composed by Nicholas Hooper

Orchestrated by Alastair King, Julian Kershaw, Geoff Alexander, Simon Whiteside and Bradley Miles
Performed by the Chamber Orchestra of London with RSVP Vocals
Conducted by Alastair King
(Except “Possession” Conducted by Nicholas Hooper)

Produced by Darrell Alexander
Recorded and Mixed by Peter Cobbin
Recorded and Mixed at Abbey Road Studios



HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE
(2009)

Music Composed by Nicholas Hooper

Orchestrated by Alastair King, Julian Kershaw, Geoff Alexander, Simon Whiteside and Bradley Miles
Performed by the Chamber Orchestra of London
With RSVP Vocals and the School Choir of Queens College, Oxford
Conducted by Alastair King and Nicholas Hooper

Produced by Darrell Alexander
Recorded and Mixed by Peter Cobbin
Recorded and Mixed at Abbey Road Studios

“Dumbledore's Speech” and “In Noctem”
Lyrics by Steve Kloves
Latin Translation by Jamie Wolpert



HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: Part 1
(2010)

Music Composed and Conducted by Alexandre Desplat

Orchestrations by Conrad Pope, Alexandre Desplat, Nan Schwartz, Clifford J. Tasner and Jean-Pascal Beintus
Performed by the London Symphony Orchestra
With London Voices Conducted by Terry Edwards
and the London Oratory Junior Choir, Schola Cantorum of the Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School Conducted Charles Cole

Produced by Alexandre Desplat and Conrad Pope
Recorded and Mixed by Peter Cobbin and Sam Okell
Recorded and Mixed at Abbey Road Studios



HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: Part 2
(2011)

Music Composed and Conducted by Alexandre Desplat

Orchestrations by Conrad Pope, Clifford J. Tasner, Jean-Pascal Beintus and Bill Newlin
Performed by the London Symphony Orchestra
With London Voices Conducted by Terry Edwards
Mai Fujisawa, solo vocal

Produced by Alexandre Desplat, Peter Cobbin, Gerard McCann and Conrad Pope
Recorded and Mixed by Peter Cobbin and Sam Okell
Recorded and Mixed at Abbey Road Studios


  1. FOREIGN VISITORS ARRIVE 1:28
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle incorporating “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)

    The album was naturally to open with Hedwig's theme, and I had several versions in consideration: the opening from Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (too dark to start off with) or a segment of "Ginny" featuring one of John Williams' original arrangements (too Williams to open this album) and this cue, which features a version of the iconic theme that is jaded but still retaining some of the innocence of the earlier films. This is followed by an ethereal statement of Patrick Doyle's own theme for Beauxbatons Academy as chariot borne by winged horses delivers their Headmistress Olympe Maxine and students; the music takes on Slavic feel for the arrival of the submersible sailing ship bringing students from the Durmstrang Institute. This cue serves both to tie this compilation with its predecessor whilst moving into new musical territory, and is a grand introduction for the album.


  2. POLYJUICE POTION 2:03
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2010 — Alexandre Desplat incorporating “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)

    Alexandre Desplat created a warm, noble theme for the Order of the Phoenix for The Deathly Hallows: Part 1 that is passed on to Dumbledore's Army in Part 2. It is heard for the first time in several variations as the Order and Harry's friends gather at the deserted house on Privet Drive to effect his escape. Through the use of Polyjuice Potion, several other characters take on the likeness of Harry in order to confuse the inevitable attackers; the rather impressive transformation sequence is musically illustrated a dreamlike sequence for woodwinds and choir. This excerpt concludes with a quote of Hedwig's theme as Hagrid informs Harry that he will be riding with him. "I brought you here 16 years ago when you were no bigger than a Bowtruckle. Seems only right that I should be the one to take you away now." If the opening track gives you the franchise and the promise of adventure, this piece offers the magic and the promise of friendship.


  3. DUMBLEDORE'S ARMY 2:37
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

    A quiet passage for woodwinds and strings is heard as Harry explains to those who gathered for the nascent Dumbledore's Army that conflict in real life is very different from what they learned in school. The mood gets more optimistic and jaunty when the students sign up and Hermione excitedly discusses the various successes of their first meeting, and reflects the spirit of her defiance to Umbridge. Here this track — which is the edit that appears on the soundtrack album; the cue in the film takes a dark turn as Umbridge is seen observing the DA's return to Hogwarts — segues to a later cue comprised of the same theme, as Harry directs the now very formidable Dumbledore's Army practicing in the Room of Requirement.


  4. SNAPE TO MALFOY MANOR 1:54
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2010 — Alexandre Desplat)

    One of Desplat's most arresting creations for the franchise is his menacing theme for the Death Eaters. It is heard several times throughout Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1, but it's most intense performance is this piece, its first appearance (the original cue title was "On the Road," but I kept the soundtrack album title because it was more descriptive of where it appears in the film). This full-bodied piece features some very interesting orchestral effects and introduces the menace that will be a common thread throughout this album.


  5. SLUGHORN'S CONFESSION 3:26
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

    Harry takes the Felix Felicius potion and effects a situation in which he is able to use Horace Slughorn's feelings toward his mother to finally gain access to the memory Dumbledore had been seeking. Hooper created a beautiful theme for Slughorn's memory of Lily Potter based upon lilting woodwinds and shimmering strings that is heard several times in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince in connection with Slughorn; it is the basis for this dramatic cue heard as the drunken professor tells Harry of the kind of magic Lily was capable of.


  6. GOLDEN EGG 4:47
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

    This is an explosive action sequence from Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire for the first challenge of the Tri-Wizard Tournament. The contestants must battle a dragon to obtain the golden egg each are guarding. The fanfare at the beginning for the establishing shot of the Quidditch pitch gives way to brassy tense statements of Doyle's danger motif as Harry waits his turn and then enters the ring. Doyle also has created a theme for Harry, and it bursts forth heroically as he summons his Firebolt; on his broomstick, he has a chance to outfly the angry Hungarian Horntail. These two themes wrestle with one another during the dragon's pursuit, but Harry's theme that claims victory with a triumphant statement of his theme. This track is somewhat streamlined from the original, unedited take that appears on the album, reflecting (though not slavishly) what was used in the film.


  7. DUMBLEDORE'S SPEECH 1:29
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper · Lyrics by Steve Kloves)

    As I mentioned in the premable, the "In Noctem" theme that Hooper composed for Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is one of his finest, not only because of how effective it is in the film but because of how well it reflects the character of Dumbledore (not just Michael Gambon's performance). The lyrics were written by screenwriter Steve Kloves and translated into Latin by Jamie Wolpert. This cue is heard at the beginning of the film, during the professor's annual address to the students at the beginning of the year and features tinkling bells, forbidding horns and bass drum.

    LATIN

    Ferte in noctem animam meam
    Illustre stellae viam meam.
    Aspectu illo glorior
    Dum capit nox diem.

    Cantate vitae canticum
    Sine dolore actae
    Dicite eis quos amabam
    Me numquam obliturum
    ENGLISH

    Carry my soul into the night.
    May the stars guide my way.
    I glory in the sight,
    As darkness takes the day.

    Sing a song, a song of life
    Made without regret
    Tell the ones, the ones I loved
    I never will forget.

  8. LILY'S THEME 2:05
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat)

    The shadow of Lily Potter lies over all of the actions of Severus Snape, and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 opens with a new theme Desplat created for Harry's mother as Snape reflects upon his tainted achievements as Headmaster of Hogwarts. Low drones and a wordless vocal by Mai Fujisawa introduce the sorrowful theme, which is then taken over by the strings as the film's title appears. Desplat, like Hooper, is not so much presenting a theme for Lily herself as he is presenting a theme for another character's memory of her.


  9. LOVELY LADIES OF BEAUXBATONS 1:15
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

    The first part of the track is from the album cut "Harry Sees Dragons," as Harry meets Hagrid near the edge of the Forbidden Forest to show him the dragons that would play a part in their first challenge (see "Golden Egg," track 6). Hagrid has another purpose: he has invited Madame Maxine out to see the creatures to impress her, yielding a romantic version of the Beauxbatons theme. From there we segue to the unreleased cue "Beauxbatons Enters," a fluttery musical confection heard as the contingent from Beauxbatons Academy command the attention of everyone in the Great Hall as they enter in a procession.


  10. PROFESSOR UMBRIDGE 1:09
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

    Dolores Umbridge was characterized by Hooper with a persistent, intentionally annoying theme led by bells. The composer referred to the sound as being inspired by an insistent ringtone. It is given a grandiose treatment for full orchestra during a montage sequence showing her grip on Hogwarts tightening, as more and more edicts are passed restricting the behavior of the students.


  11. AT THE BURROW 2:07
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2010 — Alexandre Desplat)

    Desplat's theme for the Order of the Phoenix returns as Harry and Hagrid arrive at the Burrow after the Battle of the Seven Potters and everyone must take stock of whom, and what, they have lost. This paranoid cue, much of which was edited or dialed down in the film, reflects both the bonds between the characters and the horrible uncertainties facing them.


  12. DEATH EATERS IN LONDON 1:22
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

    The opening sequence of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince depicts the Death Eaters flying into Diagon Alley and kidnapping Garick Ollivander, then destroying the Millenium Bridge (an interesting anachronism as the bridge would not have been completed in 1996, when the story takes place, although the book does describe the Death Eaters destroying a bridge). Hooper has an opportunity to build his Death Eater motif, a malevolent piece built around a relentless bass line and nervous strings.


  13. NEVILLE'S WALTZ 2:05
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

    One of the musical setpieces of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is this delightful Romantically-styled waltz, reflective of the film's refreshingly classical approach to the more amorous elements of the story. This piece begins as source music during dance practice but opens out during a montage depicting Harry and Ron's difficulties getting dates for the Yule ball, a burgeoning attraction between Hermione and Viktor Krum, and Neville's increasing proficiency at dancing.


  14. THE FLIGHT OF THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX 1:25
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

    The Order of the Phoenix appears at Privet Drive to rescue Harry from his imprisonment at the Dursley home. They travel by broomstick from Little Whinging in Surrey to London accompanied by this rousing piece illustrative of the bravery of the Order and the euphoria of their flight. As this cue is crossfaded from the previous track on the soundtrack album, I had to create a clean beginning editorially for its appearance here.


  15. OBLIVIATE 2:24
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2010: Alexandre Desplat)

    The opening of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 features Harry and Hermione severing ties with their respective pasts, and is built around a repeating, nervous ostinato while Desplat's theme for the three friends and their quest plays atop. Hermione's difficulties are given especial notice in the music, as the friends theme turns particularly emotional as she wipes her own likeness from all of her family's photographs. The quest theme will return throughout the score of Part 1, and will also double in the latter portion of Part 1 and in Part 2 as a love theme for Ron and Hermione.


  16. HARRY IN WINTER 2:51
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

    This florid variation on Doyle's theme for Harry corresponds to two cues in the film, "Harry In Winter" and "Harry and Cho," heard as Harry, determined to finally get together the gumption to ask Cho to the Yule Ball, is unfortunately shot down as she reveals that she is going with his competitor, Cedric Diggory. Both of those cues are very short ("Harry In Winter" has a very abrupt end), so Doyle composed a concert arrangement created for the end credits and the soundtrack album which builds the theme into a dreamy fantasia.


  17. HARRY AND HERMIONE 2:53
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

    The lovelornity continues with this quieter, delicate piece for bells, harp, strings and electronics, heard after Hermione sees Ron and Lavender Brown kiss, and she and Harry discuss how they both love people that they can't have. A passage with tense strings support her confrontation with Ron without spoiling the overall tone. On both the film and the soundtrack album, this crossfades into the jaunty "School," so for this disc I created a clean ending editorially to the cue.


  18. DRAGON FLIGHT 1:38
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat incorporating “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)

    This adventurous tour-de-force is heard as Harry, Ron and Hermione perform what was previously thought impossible: they break out of Gringotts Bank by freeing one of the goblin's dragons. A brief quote of Hedwig's theme builds to a soaring orchestral rendition of Lily's theme as the trio ride the dragon out of London and over the countryside. This track is one of the most exciting in the entire film series, and the scene it comes from was used as my initial announcement of this project.


  19. BENEATH THE BLACK LAKE 4:25
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

    The second task in the Tri-Wizard Tournament is revealed to be set under the Black Lake (see "Myrtle's Move," track 25). Harry is clued into the use of gillyweed by Neville (Dobby in the novel), which he uses to be able to breathe underwater. This beginning of this cue, heard as Harry finds what has been taken from each of the players, differs significantly from the track that appears on the album; the remainder of the cue is otherwise identical. Despite my affection for the underwater flourishes of the album version, I opted for the more action-packed film version (which required a late hour restructuring of this portion of the album, which ended up being advantageous for many reasons). This piece opens with a intriguing brass figure as Harry spots merpeople swimming, and follows them to the theater where Ron, Hermione, Cho Chang and Gabrielle Delacour are suspended in the water. Doyle's trademark brass rolls soon come into play as Harry finds himself faced with harsh choices to make at the point of several tridents, with heroic declamations of his main themes when a rescue is successful, culminating in a triumphant statement of Doyle's Hogwart's theme.


  20. FAREWELL ARAGOG 2:00
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

    This mournful cue for Aragog's burial (shortened considerably in the film) emphasizes not only Hagrid's sorrow, but is also the magnificent location of Hogwarts. A Scottish-tinged figure is played on fiddle over a highlands drone, with strings joining in for dramatic support as Professor Slughorn gives the a giant Acromantula a proper send-off.


  21. IN THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS 1:28
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat incorporating “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)

    Dark variations on Hedwig's theme form the basis of this short but tense action cue heard towards the conclusion of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 as Ron and Hermione attempt to destroy one of the Horcruxes in the Chamber of Secrets, causing the nexus to flood.


  22. WHEN GINNY KISSED HARRY 2:29
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

    Harry's attraction to Ginny becomes apparent to himself in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and this medley combines several appearances of Hooper's elusive, yearning love theme for them, culminating in the beauty and mystery of their first kiss in the Room of Requirement. Guitar and shimmering strings give her an appropriately ethereal but intimate presence.


  23. HARRY AND GINNY 1:38
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2010 — Alexandre Desplat)

    The theme for the Order of the Phoenix also is used as a love theme for Harry and Ginny. Their stolen kiss early morning in the Burrow (observed by an amused George Weasley with a toothbrush in his ear hole) is accompanied by the theme on solo piano with warm string passages. As befits the change in their relationship, the music here, while still intimate, is much more familiar rather than mysterious.


  24. RON'S VICTORY 1:39
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper incorporating “Quidditch, Third Year” by John Williams)

    This cue opens with the inspiring motif Hooper devised for the Felix Felicis potion, which Harry tricks Ron into thinking he's spiked his pumpkin juice with. The following sequence features a vivacious reprise of John Williams' “Double Trouble” motif from Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban as heard in the cue “Quidditch, Third Year” as Ron, assuming that he has the magical luck bestowed upon him by the potion, overcomes his self-doubts and acquits himself quite well as Keeper. This cue opens a three-track sequence that is rather lighter in tone.


  25. MYRTLE'S MOVE 0:54
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

    Continuing in a more humorous vein, Harry brings the egg won in the first task (see "Golden Egg", track 6) to the Prefect's bathroom at Cedric Diggory's recommendation. He takes off his clothes to bathe, only to find that he's not alone; Moaning Myrtle is in the bath with him. A slinky habañera accompanies Myrtle's suggestive spectral seductions. This track appears on the soundtrack album as part of "Underwater Secrets," which also includes the choral portion for the song, which doesn't appear here. However, when the soundtrack album was originally previewed, the track "Underwater Secrets" was titled "Myrtle's Move."


  26. THE MINISTRY OF MAGIC 2:36
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

    The funny interlude continues with a jaunty horn figure representing Arthur Weasley's fascination with the London Underground. As Arthur and Harry enter the Ministry's Visitor's Entrance, the music changes to reflect Harry's sense of wonder at the subterranean complex. This is tempered somewhat when Harry spots some of the Ministry's propaganda posters, and the horns creep in to hint that despite all of the dazzling façades, all is not well here.


  27. RON'S SPEECH 2:11
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat)

    Desplat's main Quest theme for his two entries doubles as a love theme for Ron and Hermione. Here it is heard emerging from the dark iterations earlier in the score as a quiet anthem of hope as Ron explains how hard he tried to return to Harry and Hermione after leaving them. This is the final form of that variation on the theme; this is the setting, led by the celli, that will be heard during their passionate kiss in the Chamber of Secrets in the last film of the series.


  28. IN NOCTEM 1:55
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Price · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper · Lyrics by Steve Kloves)

    This choral piece was written for a sequence in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince set during Harry and Dumbledore's excursion in which Professor Flitwick conducts this piece while Ron and Hermione sense the coming darkness. The scene was cut (it can be seen with the deleted material on the DVD and Blu-ray editions), but the music was preserved at the conclusion of the end credits roll-up. It is based on Dumbledore's theme as introduced in "Dumbledore's Speech" (track 7), but is an a cappella arrangement for boy choir.

    LATIN

    Ferte in noctem animam meam
    Illustre stellae viam meam.
    Aspectu illo glorior
    Dum capit nox diem.

    Cantate vitae canticum
    Sine dolore actae
    Dicite eis quos amabam
    Me numquam obliturum
    ENGLISH

    Carry my soul into the night.
    May the stars guide my way.
    I glory in the sight,
    As darkness takes the day.

    Sing a song, a song of life
    Made without regret
    Tell the ones, the ones I loved
    I never will forget.

  29. STATUES 1:43
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat)

    An ostinato also based in Desplat's Quest theme forms the backbone of this rousing cue for the sequence in which Minerva McGonagall begins directing the defenses of the castle in preparation for the Battle of Hogwarts. The track on this album is the same edit as what appears in the film's end credits medley, with the more textural central portion removed.


  30. ARCHWAY DUEL 1:30
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

    Basses and celli thunder out a desperate figure as Harry and his friends, trapped in the Hall of Mysteries with furious and murderous Death Eaters, are joined by Sirius Black, and later the Order of the Phoenix, whose entrance is marked with a choir. Hooper's active, belligerent cue emphasizes the danger of the situation as well as the anger of the characters as they duel one another. This is an excerpt from the album track "Death of Sirius," but was retitled as the track here concludes just before that event.


  31. DEATH OF CEDRIC 1:43
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

    Harry returns with the corpse of Cedric Diggory to Hogwarts. This wrenching piece scores Amos Diggory's shock and despair; the music is built out of the Harry and Hogwarts themes, but flattened and twisted, casting an air of helplessness over the scene. This is one of the most emotive cues in the entire franchise, emphasizing Jeff Rawle's extremely effective performance in the film.


  32. POSSESSION 2:36
    (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix · 2007 — Nicholas Hooper)

    Much of the plot of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix centers around the mental connection between Harry and Voldemort. During the battle in the Ministry of Magic, the Dark Lord attempts to exploit this association by entering Harry's mind and filling him with despair. This backfires because Harry knows love and friendship, two qualities Voldemort can't comprehend. Hooper's music for this scene is built around a mounting string line that is heard in different variations, eventually leading to an emotional climax as Harry remembers his friends, and resists Voldemort. This theme will form the basis for some of Harry's most morally ambiguous moments in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, including Harry's cursing of Malfoy in the bathroom, as well as Harry forcing Dumbledore to drink the potion, but it is in its most concise form here.


  33. VOLDEMORT 6:50
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle)

    The conclusion of the Tri-Wizard Tournament has Harry and Cedric both being transported by a portkey to Riddle Manor, where Wormtail murders Cedric and casts the spell that returns the Dark Lord to his full strength. Doyle's danger motif is built out into a lengthy fantasia of cruelty, with Voldemort represented by dark, silky textures as he calls his Death Eaters to him and challenges Harry to a duel. When Harry faces Voldemort, their wands connect, and the magical cores react, causing Voldemort's wand to perform priori incantatum, causing ghostly images of his victims to appear. The connection itself is scored in an almost Wagnerian manner, but the appearance of Harry's parents brings a desperate but hopeful variation of his theme to the fore, gradually and spectacularly overtaking all of the other elements as Harry manages to escape.


  34. TOM RIDDLE'S LAST STAND 4:08
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat incorporating “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)

    This suite encompasses the final part of the Battle of Hogwarts, centered around Harry's confrontation with Voldemort. It opens quietly enough, with strings and brass building beneath "Neville the Hero," a stalwart call to arms to fight despite the appearance that the battle has been lost, and Harry is dead. The music explodes in a blaze of brass with the revelation that Harry is, in fact, still alive (to Voldemort's shock and horror), and Neville's bravery calls the Sword of Gryffindor to him through the Sorting Hat. We then segue to the second part of Harry and Voldemort's apparition fight featuring an aggressive variation on Hedwig's theme in a portion from "Showdown," which is then followed by the crescendo from "Voldemort's End." The suite concludes with a brief vocal reprise of Lily's theme as Voldemort is destroyed finally, once and for all.


  35. DUMBLEDORE'S FAREWELL 2:19
    (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince · 2009 — Nicholas Hooper)

    Hogwarts grieves over the lifeless form of Dumbledore, yielding one of the most arresting pieces of music written for the entire film series. Hooper builds his theme for Dumbledore into an elegy with the melodic lines from "In Noctem" overlapping, strings joined later by wordless boy choir as McGonagall and the students light their wands to dispel the Dark Mark over the school. This cue would be used again in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 as Harry sees the events from Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince unfold from Snape's point of view. I chose to place this track after the final victory over Voldemort to reflect how that feat was not achieved without consequences.


  36. A NEW BEGINNING 1:32
    (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 · 2011 — Alexandre Desplat)

    The material from "Statues" is further developed into this introspective cue for harp, strings and woodwinds. Harry, Hermione and Ron reflect on all that they have accomplished and now have the prospect of a future. This hopeful cue serves as this album's denouement.


  37. OWL POST 0:32
    (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire · 2005 — Patrick Doyle adapted from “Hedwig's Theme” by John Williams)

    The album concludes with a short coda, the brief, unreleased reprise of Hedwig's theme heard in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire during breakfast in the Great Hall (the Patil twins walk by with their "Hi, Harry!" and then Harry spills pumpkin juice on himself while Cho is watching). The arrangement is similar to that heard in "Foreign Visitors Arrive," bringing this album full-circle.

THE END
Tags: alexandre desplat, cinema, film music, harry potter, john williams, my mixes, nicholas hooper, patrick doyle
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