Joshua Gizelt (swashbuckler332) wrote,
Joshua Gizelt
swashbuckler332

  • Mood:
  • Music:

“The cosmos is within us. We are made of star-stuff. We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.”

“The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars.”
— Carl Sagan

Several years ago, inspired by a book of Hubble photographs, I organized a playlist specifically to accompany the astronomy images that I have as my screensaver for my Apple TV. I enjoyed it very much, and a few weeks ago, I started thinking how I could make the playlist into a mix. I thought of several other pieces that would fit, as well as how to tweak the tracks I had already included to make a better musical program.

The sheer enormity of the universe is mind-bogging. Our human brains find it difficult to think in astronomical scales which are so beyond our personal experience, it is often challenging to comprehend and communicate. And yet, that vast ocean of stars has an irresistible pull toward the ancestral wanderer within us. The astronomical scope, and the human desire to explore it are the central ideas behind this album. In choosing music, I was looking for pieces that would reflect the scale and beauty of the universe, but that desire to probe the cosmos ended up providing a surprisingly intimate dimension to this anthology.



    Side One

    VANGELIS
  1. “Movement III” from Heaven and Hell (4:08)
    Used as the title music for Cosmos: A Personal Journey by Carl Sagan
    Vangelis, Synthesizers


  2. RON JONES
  3. “Double Star” from the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Evolution” (1:26)
    Orchestra Conducted by Ron Jones


  4. DAVID PAICH
  5. “The Trip To Arrakis” from Dune (2:33)
    Vienna Symphony Orchestra Conducted by Marty Paich
    Vienna Volksoper Choir Conducted by Allyn Ferguson


  6. MAURICE JARRE
  7. “Night and Sun” from Lawrence of Arabia (1:11)
    City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra Conducted by Nic Raine


  8. JOHN WILLIAMS
  9. “The Trip To Earth” from Superman (2:21)
    London Symphony Orchestra Conducted by John Williams


  10. JAMES HORNER
  11. “The Dark Side of the Moon” from Apollo 13 (5:12)
    Orchestra Conducted by James Horner
    Annie Lennox, Vocals • Tim Morrison, Trumpet


  12. CHRISTOPHER YOUNG
  13. “Star Bright” from Species (5:01)
    Orchestra and Choir Conducted by Pete Anthony


  14. HANS ZIMMER
  15. “Entering Endurance” from Interstellar (2:34)
    Orchestra Conducted by Gavin Greenaway


  16. DAVID NEWMAN
  17. “Celestial Transportations” from Galaxy Quest (1:30)
    Orchestra and Choir Conducted by David Newman


  18. CRAIG SAFAN
  19. “Alex Dreams” from The Last Starfighter (1:43)
    Orchestra Conducted by Craig Safan


  20. JOHN BARRY
  21. “Pretty Busy” from The Black Hole (0:44)
    Orchestra Conducted by John Barry


  22. BASIL POLEDOURIS
  23. “Carmen’s Shuttle Ride” from Starship Troopers (1:38)
    Orchestra Conducted by Basil Poledouris


  24. DENNIS McCARTHY
  25. “A Christmas Hug” from Star Trek: Generations (6:13)
    Orchestra and Choir Conducted by Dennis McCarthy


  26. JERRY GOLDSMITH
  27. “The Mutant” from Total Recall (3:16)
    National Philharmonic Orchestra of London Conducted by Jerry Goldsmith


  28. Side Two

    ALAN SILVESTRI
  29. “Awful Waste of Space” from Contact (1:40)
    Orchestra Conducted by Alan Silvestri


  30. ALEX NORTH
  31. “Moon Rocket Bus” from the Unused Score for 2001: A Space Odyssey (5:00)
    National Philharmonic Orchestra of London Conducted by Jerry Goldsmith


  32. BEAR McCREARY
  33. “The View” from Europa Report (2:29)
    Orchestra Conducted by Bear McCreary


  34. JERRY GOLDSMITH
  35. “Floating Office” from Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1:00)
    Orchestra Conducted by Jerry Goldsmith


  36. BRUCE BROUGHTON
  37. “The Time Bubbles” from Lost In Space (2:19)
    Sinfonia of London Conducted by Bruce Broughton


  38. BILL CONTI
  39. “Daybreak In Space” from The Right Stuff (2:42)
    Orchestra Conducted by Bill Conti


  40. JOHN BARRY
  41. “Launch Adrift” from Star Crash: The Adventures of Stella Starr (1:42)
    Orchestra Conducted by John Barry


  42. JERRY GOLDSMITH
  43. “Hyper-Sleep” from Alien (2:41)
    National Philharmonic Orchestra of London Conducted by Lionel Newman


  44. JOHN WILLIAMS
  45. “In Orbit” from SpaceCamp (3:09)
    Orchestra Conducted by John Williams


  46. SUBVISION
  47. “Parting Comrades” from the Farscape episode “Family Ties” (3:27)
    SubVision (Chris Neal, Braedy Neal and Toby Neal)


  48. JOHN BARRY
  49. “Flight Into Space” from Moonraker (6:04)
    City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra Conducted by Nic Raine
    Crouch End Festival Chorus Conducted by David Temple


  50. FREDDY MERCURY • HOWARD BLAKE
  51. “The Kiss” from Flash Gordon (2:51)
    National Philharmonic Orchestra of London Conducted by Howard Blake
    Freddie Mercury, Vocals


  52. JOHN WILLIAMS
  53. “Finale” from Close Encounters of the Third Kind (7:33)
    Incorporates “When You Wish Upon a Star” from Pinocchio Written by Leigh Harline & Ned Washington
    Orchestra and Choir Conducted by John Williams

“Ever since there have been people, there have been explorers, looking in places where other hadn't been before. Not everyone does it, but we are part of a species where some members of the species do—to the benefit of us all.”
— Neil DeGrasse Tyson

    Side One

    VANGELIS
  1. “Movement III” from Heaven and Hell (4:08)
    Used as the title music for Cosmos: A Personal Journey by Carl Sagan
    Vangelis, Synthesizers


    To millions of Americans, Cosmos: A Personal Journey by Carl Sagan was the gateway to a larger appreciation of science in general and cosmology in particular. The title sequence for the show depicted the familiar (optically impossible) “moving through space” imagery popularized by Star Trek, but instead of flying through stars, Cosmos shows us flying through thousands of galaxies. The music for the program was assembled from various pieces from all over the world (an approach which would be cost-prohibitive today). The title music was taken from Vangelis' 1975 album Heaven and Hell, a lone piano blossoming out into an expansive electronic soundscape, it perfectly illustrates a gigantic universe.


  2. RON JONES
  3. “Double Star” from the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Evolution” (1:26)
    Orchestra Conducted by Ron Jones


    “This romantic theme was about the wonder of the universe and taking it all in. I tried to play the episode from Wesley’s point of view, his wonderment.”
    Ron Jones' music gave Star Trek: The Next Generation a grand, epic quality that was, in the end, not desired by the producers, but before he left the show after the fourth season, he created some of its most distinctive musical moments. This cue, which opened the third season, is one of them, and as Jones' description of the cue above from the liner notes of The Ron Jones Project box set, is exactly what this album is all about. A beautiful theme is voiced on synthesizers depicting the beauty of the binary suns, which is taken up by strings as we find Wesley (Will Wheaton) passed out from his studies, which gives the album a fluid transition from electronics to orchestra.


  4. DAVID PAICH
  5. “The Trip To Arrakis” from Dune (2:33)
    Vienna Symphony Orchestra Conducted by Marty Paich
    Vienna Volksoper Choir Conducted by Allyn Ferguson


    David Lynch's 1984 adaptation of Dune was primarily scored by the rock band Toto. While their distinctive sound is more prominent in the second half of the film where it represents the Fremen and the will of Paul Maud'dib (Kyle MacLaughlan), the earlier scenes take their inspiration more from the labyrinthine feudal political intrigue. As the Atreides travel from their home on Caladan to the harsh and unforgiving Arrakis, we have a visually arresting sequence depicting the Spice Navigators folding space. The music for the scene, written by Toto member David Paich, is a very textural piece for orchestra and choir that was inspired by Dimitri Shostakovich's 11th Symphony, illustrating the mystery and poetry of the event.


  6. MAURICE JARRE
  7. “Night and Sun” from Lawrence of Arabia (1:11)
    City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra Conducted by Nic Raine


    This glittering sequence is from David Lean's magnum opus; it is heard in the scene in which Lawrence (Peter O'Toole) spends his first night in the desert with his Bedouin guide Tafas (Zia Mohyeddin). The two men gaze up at the heavens, yielding a shot of the stars in the sky that when projected in 70 millimeter is as arresting as any of the breathtaking vistas in the film. While most of the music on this compilation consists of selections from films or television series that are space-related, Maurice Jarre's beauteous and reverent depiction of stargazing — the basis for all astronomy, after all — merited inclusion.


  8. JOHN WILLIAMS
  9. “The Trip To Earth” from Superman (2:21)
    London Symphony Orchestra Conducted by John Williams


    Richard Donner's 1978 Superman was the first modern comic book movie, and its score by John Williams remains a classic of the genre. Fearing the destruction of Krypton but unable to speak out for political reasons, Jor-El (Marlon Brando) and Lara (Susannah York) launch their infant son Kal-El in a crystalline starship to take him to a primitive planet, but one where he will look enough like the native inhabitants to fit in. Kal-El's journey through several galaxies to reach Earth is scored by Williams with a unique motif voiced on bells, strings and brass, with other parts of the orchestra coming in to depict the various phenomena the spacecraft encounters on its journey, with frequent interpolations of the Superman fanfare.


  10. JAMES HORNER
  11. “The Dark Side of the Moon” from Apollo 13 (5:12)
    Orchestra Conducted by James Horner
    Annie Lennox, Vocals • Tim Morrison, Trumpet


    This album's purpose is to musically explore both the wonders of space and the personal desire to probe its mysteries, and this selection from Ron Howard's masterful Apollo 13 covers both. After the infamous accident, in order to get back to Earth with their remaining fuel, the ship must use the Moon's gravity to gain enough momentum to make the journey home. While they are painfully aware that they have lost their opportunity to land on the moon, the astronauts nevertheless are treated to an astounding view of the dark side of the moon, during which there is a radio blackout, cutting the three men completely off from Earth for a few minutes. James Horner's mysterioso textures enhanced by Annie Lennox's wordless vocals reflect the serene but breathtaking view, which is then followed by a moving presentation of the film's main theme led by Tim Morrison's trumpet in which Jim Lovell (Tom Hanks) imagines the Moon mission that should have been, and his missed chance to fulfill his life's dream of walking on the Moon.


  12. CHRISTOPHER YOUNG
  13. “Star Bright” from Species (5:01)
    Orchestra and Choir Conducted by Pete Anthony


    Roger Donaldson's Species was an exploitation film writ large, about a human/alien hybrid Sil (Natasha Henstridge), who escapes from the laboratory she was developed in and attempts to mate with a suitable human male. This is the end credits sequence, which presents Chris Young's main theme of the film dominated by celeste, harp, flute, choir and castanets. The music acknowledges the grand scale of space, but also warns of the dangers that may be out there.


  14. HANS ZIMMER
  15. “Entering Endurance” from Interstellar (2:34)
    Orchestra Conducted by Gavin Greenaway


    Christopher Nolan's Interstellar depicts and attempt to migrate humanity off of the now-blighted Earth. As the protagonists reach their ship Endurance and prepare her for their mission, Hans Zimmer presents a haunting theme that up until this point in the film has been used to depict the great mysteries of the story, but here — no doubt as a nod to Stanley Kubrick's iconic use of Johann Strauss' waltz “On the Beautiful Blue Danube” in 2001: A Space Odyssey — it opens out into a beautiful waltz-like passage.


  16. DAVID NEWMAN
  17. “Celestial Transportations” from Galaxy Quest (1:30)
    Orchestra and Choir Conducted by David Newman


    Dean Parisot's Galaxy Quest is both a spoof and an homage to televised science-fiction, particularly Star Trek, a rare work that manages to poke good-natured fun at both the genre and its fans, while at the same time, celebrating the genre and those fans. David Newman's score, like the film, manages be both a parody of and a satisfying space opera score. This piece is a combination of two cues from the film: a goofy opening leads to a thunderous tutti for orchestra and choir in “Revealing the Universe,” in which hungover Jason Nesmith (Tim Allen) realizes to an ethereal choral passage that these strange people aren't just fans of Galaxy Quest, but actually aliens with interstellar travel; that choral sequence is explored more fully in “Meet the Thermians,” appropriately set against the Galaxy Quest television theme as the rest of the TV cast make contact with the Thermians.


  18. CRAIG SAFAN
  19. “Alex Dreams” from The Last Starfighter (1:43)
    Orchestra Conducted by Craig Safan


    Nick Castle's The Last Starfighter is as much about the dreams and ambitions of its protagonist as it is about spaceships, laser guns and explosions. This scene takes place at the beginning of the film when Alex Rogan (Lance Guest), who has to cancel plans with his girlfriend Maggie (Mary Stewart Masterson). Alex takes a moment to himself before attacking the ever-growing list of demands his neighbors place upon him, and we see his room is decorated with various space paraphernalia as his form of escape — but he is tied down to the reality that he lives in this trailer park, sees the same people, and hears the same conversations every day. When working on the initial expansion form the brief 1984 Geffen LP for Intrada Records in 1995, Craig Safan insisted that this cue be included because it is the only time in the score you hear the theme played in this pensive manner.


  20. JOHN BARRY
  21. “Pretty Busy” from The Black Hole (0:44)
    Orchestra Conducted by John Barry


    There are three John Barry scores represented on this anthology, and all of them are from the year 1979. The Black Hole was Disney's entry into the cinematic “space race” that occurred tin the wake of the success of Star Wars, and John Barry was tapped to compose the score. The film depicts the mystery of what happened on the Cygnus, much of Barry's score revolves around that question while still staying consistent with his approach to the science fiction aspect. This selection which features a restless string figure offset by unsettling electronic wailings is from early on in the film, when Dan Holland (Robert Forster) finds the formerly deserted Cygnus is now suddenly bustling with activity.


  22. BASIL POLEDOURIS
  23. “Carmen’s Shuttle Ride” from Starship Troopers (1:38)
    Orchestra Conducted by Basil Poledouris


    Paul Verhoeven's bold and divisive adaptation of Robert Heinlein's Starship Troopers features an epic space opera score by his frequent collaborator, the late Basil Poledouris. The composer responded to this quirky movie with one of his most colorful scores. This cue opens playfully as cadet Carmen Ibanez (Denise Richards) races her classmate Stack Lumbrezer (Amy Smart) for the privilege of piloting their shuttle transport to their new assignment, the starship Roger Young. Ibanez wins the race, and as she takes the helm and demonstrates her daredevil skills, and the full orchestra comes in with Carmen's theme to reflect her great pleasure at flying.

    This was one of the most frustrating inclusions on this album, although not for any technical or musical reason. This cue wasn't included on the original soundtrack album, but I had planned to include it sourced from a bootleg once I determined that I was going to expand on the original playlist version. However, just as I put together the initial assembly, Varèse Sarabande announced that they were releasing a Deluxe Edition of the complete Starship Troopers score. I ordered the disc immediately, but in addition to having to wait for the shipping date, once the discs actually were sent out, a pressing glitch was identified. Varèse put a halt on all orders, including my own, in order to wait until the corrected discs were available. This meant that I had to wait another several weeks before the CDs arrived and I could complete the mix. On the other hand, the set itself was worth the wait, and the sound quality of the track is much superior than the boot.


  24. DENNIS McCARTHY
  25. “A Christmas Hug” from Star Trek: Generations (6:13)
    Orchestra and Choir Conducted by Dennis McCarthy


    Captain Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) is brought into the Nexus, a phenomenon in which time does not exist, and a person can live out their greatest desires. Picard, who is still reeling from the death of his brother and nephew, imagines himself on Earth at Christmastime, amongst a wife and children he never had. While the imagery ostensibly is showing us the Dickensian ideal that Picard imagines, the ornaments on the tree and glittering lights imply the allure of space which is Picard's true life path that are underlying his ultimate dissatisfaction with the illusion, which is when he subconsciously calls upon the echo of Guinan (Whoopi Goldberg), who had inhabited the Nexus decades earlier. Dennis McCarthy's exquisite scoring for the scene is dominated by the serene choral Nexus theme, but is counterpointed against the main Generations theme and is often offset by dissonance reflecting how wrong the situation is, no matter how comforting.


  26. JERRY GOLDSMITH
  27. “The Mutant” from Total Recall (3:16)
    National Philharmonic Orchestra of London Conducted by Jerry Goldsmith


    Jerry Goldsmith's score for Paul Verhoeven's Martians, Mutants and Arnold Schwarzenegger adventure is a balls-to-the-wall action score, but there are a few moments where he is able to explore the more complex ideas of identity and science fiction floated by the film. Douglas Quaid (Schwarzenegger) is brought to meet the leader of the resistance, Kuato (Marshall Bell). Goldsmith's music for Mars has, until this point in the film, only been heard in short transitions, but here it is built out into a rapturous cue. Electronics dominate as Kuato and Quaid converse about character versus memory, but the orchestra takes on a more prominent role as Kuato uses his psychic abilities on Quaid to extract buried memories of an alien reactor. This is the album mix of this cue, which has a more explosive end than the film version to conclude “Side One” of this album.


  28. Side Two

    ALAN SILVESTRI
  29. “Awful Waste of Space” from Contact (1:40)
    Orchestra Conducted by Alan Silvestri


    Robert Zemeckis' flawed version of Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan's novel Contact was graced with a score by Alan SIlvestri, with whom the director has worked since Romancing the Stone in 1984. The composer provided an expressive theme for Ellie Arroway (Jodie Foster) which reflects the character's view of space through the lens given her by her father Theodore (David Morse). As such, while the glistening opening acknowledges the vast starscapes out there, the music ends up going to a much more personal place, with warm strings and horns.


  30. ALEX NORTH
  31. “Moon Rocket Bus” from the Unused Score for 2001: A Space Odyssey (5:00)
    National Philharmonic Orchestra of London Conducted by Jerry Goldsmith


    One of the most famous — or infamous — rejections of a film score occurred on Stanley Kubrick's classic genre-redefining science fiction epic 2001: A Space Odyssey. Alex North was commissioned by M-G-M to provide an original score, but recording of the score was suspended while in progress, and Kubrick opted to use his temporary track choices. This particular piece would have been heard in the film during the journey of Heywood Floyd (William Sylvester) along the Moon's surface to TMA-1 (the Monolith), which in the film was accompanied by music from avant garde composer Gyorgi Ligeti (who was apparently none too pleased with Kubrick's appropriations). North's approach to the scene was to anchor the piece with a line for wordless mezzo-soprano while the orchestra provides the rhythm, with a sections for French horn and organ. While it is inarguable that Kubrick's final musical choices for 2001 helped make the film the iconic work it is seen as today, North's score would have made for an interesting, but very different, experience.


  32. BEAR McCREARY
  33. “The View” from Europa Report (2:29)
    Orchestra Conducted by Bear McCreary


    Sebastián Cordero's science fiction take on the “found footage” genre gave composer Bear McCreary an interesting challenge; he required was to compose a score that would both reflect the story and the characters, but the film itself also had to work as a piece of propaganda for the company that funded the mission. In one scene, the ship's engineer James Corrigan (Sharlto Copley) aims his camera out the window of Europa One, introducing this ruminative variation on the questing main theme for the film for strings, woodwinds and electronics, which plays out as the various principals of the film discuss their hopes for the mission.


  34. JERRY GOLDSMITH
  35. “Floating Office” from Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1:00)
    Orchestra Conducted by Jerry Goldsmith


    Jerry Goldsmith's score for Star Trek: The Motion Picture is one of his best, as well as a landmark science fiction score. While the title march would eventually grace Star Trek: The Next Generation, the composer was also tasked with illustrating the future in which Star Trek takes place. This flowing piece was one of the few cues that made it into the film from the first set of recording sessions, recorded before the iconic main theme was composed. It is heard as Admiral James Kirk (William Shatner) beams from Earth to an orbiting space station because the transporters on the Enterprise are malfunctioning; as with many sequences in this film, Goldsmith composed to black leader because the effects had not been completed in time for the scoring.


  36. BRUCE BROUGHTON
  37. “The Time Bubbles” from Lost In Space (2:19)
    Sinfonia of London Conducted by Bruce Broughton


    Bruce Broughton's score for the 1998 film version of the vintage Monster-of-the-Week television series Lost In Space is represented here by a cue from the middle of the film as the characters begin to figure out that the events unfolding are the results of time travel. The enigma is countered by intimate passages and warm readings of the main fanfare, which open into a grand orchestral statement. This is the title that graced the original Intrada score album, although the source was the expanded 2 disc set, where it is called “Energy Bubbles/Dog Tags No. 2/John and West Set Out.” I reverted to the original title as it was less cumbersome.


  38. BILL CONTI
  39. “Daybreak In Space” from The Right Stuff (2:42)
    Orchestra Conducted by Bill Conti


    “The sun is coming through the window now… Oh, Lord, what a heavenly light.”
    Bill Conti won an Oscar for his work on Philip Kaufmann's adaptation of Tom Wolfe's novel about the Mercury Program, The Right Stuff. On his first orbit, astronaut Gordon Cooper (Dennis Quaid), the last of the Mercury Seven to make it into space, and a smart aleck hotshot always ready with a quip or sarcastic observation, is genuinely moved by the majesty of a sunrise he witnesses from space. Conti builds up to a transcendental variation on his main theme. This piece has some wow and flutter that were on the original source material. While Conti has recorded a suite of music from this score with the London Symphony Orchestra, unfortunately this cue was not one of the ones included, and so the only source is the damaged original soundtrack recording.


  40. JOHN BARRY
  41. “Launch Adrift” from Star Crash: The Adventures of Stella Starr (1:42)
    Orchestra Conducted by John Barry


    Another John Barry science fiction score from 1979, Star Crash: The Adventures of Stella Starr was an Italian-produced entry into the aforementioned post-Star Wars “space race.” Barry was sought out specifically because the movie was meant to be a “female James Bond in space,” and so the score often evokes his music for the spy genre. This scene, however, which depicts smugglers Stella Starr (Catherine Munro) and Akton (Marjoe Gortner) finding and exploring one of the three space pods that are the film's MacGuffins, is instead scored in his lilting, romantic style, giving the sequence a wondrous dimension.


  42. JERRY GOLDSMITH
  43. “Hyper-Sleep” from Alien (2:41)
    National Philharmonic Orchestra of London Conducted by Lionel Newman


    At the beginning of Ridley Scott's Alien, there is a sequence in which the crew of Nostromo are revived from stasis in one of the many birth images that would become horribly perverted later in the film. Jerry Goldsmith's original cue for the film opened with flutes ticking away at a recurring “time” motif, and blossomed into a full presentation of his main theme for the film as ship's XO Kane (John Hurt) awakens. The version that appears in the film is very similar but drops the melodic line in the latter portion of the cue; for this album, I decided to go with Goldsmith's original, more thematic version.


  44. JOHN WILLIAMS
  45. “In Orbit” from SpaceCamp (3:09)
    Orchestra Conducted by John Williams


    The central conceit of SpaceCamp is a wish-fulfillment story of getting to travel on the Space Shuttle, but had the unfortunate timing to be released shortly after the destruction of the Challenger. A malfunctioning robot causes an incident that forces NASA to launch a class of touring Space Camp students and their frustrated astronaut guide (Kate Capshaw) into space. John Williams builds his exultant secondary theme for the film into a grandiose passage for orchestra, depicting the grace of the Space Shuttle and the beauty of the Earth from space.


  46. SUBVISION
  47. “Parting Comrades” from the Farscape episode “Family Ties” (3:27)
    SubVision (Chris Neal, Braedy Neal and Toby Neal)


    The season one finale of Farscape concludes with many of the characters saying farewell to each other, believing themselves to be on what will probably be a suicide mission. Season one composing/performing team SubVision provided this tender piece for the the farewells and the visually arresting final shot of the season, in which John Crichton (Ben Browder) and Ka D'Argo (Anthony Simcoe) are floating in space alone in front of a planet with fiery surface.

    This particular piece is very special to me, as I began associating it with my temporary foster kitten Éclair, whom I had while I was finishing up the master for this album. Hearing this track makes me think of her.


  48. JOHN BARRY
  49. “Flight Into Space” from Moonraker (6:04)
    City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra Conducted by Nic Raine
    Crouch End Festival Chorus Conducted by David Temple


    Another John Barry score from 1979, this time for Moonraker, the James Bond franchise's entry in the post-Star Wars “space race.” Bond (Roger Moore) and Holly Goodhead (Lois Chiles) launch into a space on a Moonraker shuttle bound for a secret space station, the lair of the villain Hugo Drax (Michael Lonsdale). Barry's music for the journey is stately and rhapsodic, with angelic choral passages and monolithic statements featuring a pipe organ of a fanfare built out of the main “Moonraker” theme. My original plan was to use the original soundtrack recording, but I ended up choosing this excerpt from the Silva Bond Back In Action 2 album primarily for reasons of sound quality.


  50. FREDDY MERCURY • HOWARD BLAKE
  51. “The Kiss” from Flash Gordon (2:51)
    National Philharmonic Orchestra of London Conducted by Howard Blake
    Freddie Mercury, Vocals


    The 1980 Dino De Laurentiis production of Flash Gordon featured songs and music by the superstar band Queen, but also an orchestral score by Howard Blake. The score and the songs were designed to co-exist, and Blake's score features a lot of themes and motifs originated by members of Queen. The scenes in which Princess Aura (Ornella Muti) revives the ostensibly-dead Flash (Sam J. Jones) and the later flight through Mongo were scored with a theme written by Freddie Mercury, who in the film and on the original Queen soundtrack album, also provided vocals; Blake arranges Mercury's theme into an exquisite passage for strings, harp and celeste. SuperTracks issued a promo of Howard Blake's score in 2000, but it only contained a more detailed transfer of the orchestral tracks, but none of Mercury's vocals were included, so for this track I combined elements of “The Kiss (Aura Resurrects Flash)” from the Queen album with “Bell and Coffin” and “Rocket Ship Flight” from the Supertracks promo.


  52. JOHN WILLIAMS
  53. “Finale” from Close Encounters of the Third Kind (7:33)
    Incorporates “When You Wish Upon a Star” from Pinocchio Written by Leigh Harline & Ned Washington
    Orchestra and Choir Conducted by John Williams


    Music was central to the storyline of Steven Spielberg's UFO opus Close Encounters of the Third Kind as it is used as a mathematical form of communication for the humans and aliens. John Williams now-iconic five-note motif was incorporated into the score, and along with a rising choral theme, forms the basis for the basis for the climax of the film, in which Roy Neary (Richard Dreyfuss) is selected by the aliens to come with them onto their craft, and the end credits, in which the alien mothership lifts off and flies into space, having achieved peaceful contact between two worlds. In the 1977 and 1998 versions of the film and the original soundtrack album, this thematic exploration led into a reprise of the film's chase music achieved editorially. While this track is primarily sourced from the 1998 Collector's Edition, I used the HD transfer of the original LP edition to get a clean beginning; I also replicated the crossfade to the end credits that appears on the original album and in the film. The 1980 Special Edition and the 1998 Collector's Edition soundtrack plays out as originally recorded — with an adaptation of Leigh Harline and Ned Washington's legendary (and Oscar-winning) “When You Wish Upon a Star” from the classic 1940 Disney adaptation of Pinocchio, a relevant evergreen to bring the album to a satisfying close.
Tags: alan silvestri, alex north, basil poledouris, bear mccreary, bill conti, christopher young, craig safan, david newman, dennis mccarthy, hans zimmer, howard blake, james horner, jerry goldsmith, john barry, john williams, maurice jarre, my mixes, ron jones, science, science fiction, star trek, superman, vangelis
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Comments allowed for friends only

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 2 comments