Joshua Gizelt (swashbuckler332) wrote,
Joshua Gizelt
swashbuckler332

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Terror in the Tub

I had originally wanted to redo my Fear! mix that I had made several years ago in time for Hallowe'en this year. Circumstances prevented me from being able to do that, so I decided to leave the project for next year. However, I recently had an idea for a different approach to the material; instead of a single disc I would make three, and each one would be a different type of horror score.

This is the first disc of this series that I have compiled, and this one concentrates on the electronic type of score that has become it's own genre. I tried to combine very recognizable material with some that is more obscure, but I also wanted to make sure to include some music that was scary in its own right.

Normally I proceed with a "side one/side two" format for mixes, but in this case I made it in three general parts. The first is an essay of genuinely spooky music. I then have a suite of rock/pop oriented pieces because they do represent a certain side of the genre, and I felt that it was important to break up the really dark music for listening purposes. The final section of the album is more scary music, but now with momentum as the danger is confronted, leading to a satisfying finale.



THE SHAPE STALKS
FEAR: Cycle One


67:07

1.
JOHN CARPENTER: Halloween - Loomis and Shape's Car (3:26)
John Carpenter, Dan Wyman, keyboards

2.
TREVOR JONES: Angel Heart - Harry? Johnny? (7:47)
Daniel Lawson, Trevor Jones, keyboards; Courtney Pine, saxophone, Mickey Rourke, voice

3.
HANS ZIMMER: Paperhouse - Overture (6:17)
Hans Zimmer, keyboards; Nigel Holland, sound effects

4.
WENDY CARLOS & RACHEL ELKIND: The Shining - Main Theme (2:48)
Mark Ayres, keyboards; Hector Berlioz, 'Dies Irae' arrangement

5.
GRAEME REVELL: Dead Calm - Breaking Free (6:20)
SPK; Nicholas Ferner-Waite, soprano; Jolanta Nagajeck, contralto

6.
CHARLES BERNSTEIN: A Nightmare on Elm Street - The Man in the Hat (3:42)
Charles Bernstein, keyboards

7.
JAN HAMMER: Tales from the Crypt - Three's A Crowd (3:41)
Jan Hammer, keyboards

8.
BRAD FIEDEL: Fright Night - Come To Me (3:51)
Brad Fiedel, Ross Levinson, keyboards

9.
JOHN CARPENTER & ALAN HOWARTH: They Live - End Title (3:15)
Daniel Caine, keyboards

10.
TANGERINE DREAM: Firestarter - Flash Final (4:43)
Christopher Franke, Johannes Schmoelling, Edgar Froese, keyboards

11.
HANS ZIMMER: Paperhouse - Me and My Daughter, We Get On Like A House On Fire (7:54)
Hans Zimmer, keyboards; Nigel Holland, sound effects

12.
PHILIP GLASS: Candyman - Helen's Theme (1:55)
Choir Conducted by Michael Reissman

13.
JOHN CARPENTER: Halloween - The Shape Stalks (1:32)
John Carpenter, Dan Wyman, keyboards

14.
MICHEL RUBINI & DENNY JAEGER: The Hunger - The Final Death (1:59)
Michel Rubini, Denny Jaeger, keyboards

15.
GRAEME REVELL: Dead Calm - Reunited (2:53)
SPK; Graeme Revell, vocalizations

16.
JOHN MURPHY: 28 Days Later - In the House (3:28)
John Murphy, keyboards

17.
THOMAS NEWMAN: The Lost Boys - Frogs on the Case (1:26)
Thomas Newman, keyboards


Liner Notes


JOHN CARPENTER: Halloween - Loomis and Shape's Car
I opened with this iconic theme, feeling that it was an instantly accessible lead-in to what would follow. I used the original LP stereo mix of this track rather than the somewhat flatter remaster.

TREVOR JONES: Angel Heart - Harry? Johnny?
This track is actually very heavily edited owing as to the fact that the soundtrack album had a lot of dialogue on it. I was very careful, and so it is impossible to tell where the edits are (even for me, and I made them!) but I was unable to completely eliminate all of the dialogue. The opening and closing of these tracks feature Mickey Rourke saying "Johnny?" or "Harry?" and I felt that this could be included. I wasn't able to get rid of his answer to a cop who tells him that he's going to burn. It is barely audible, and it bothers me, but I couldn't get rid of it with a clean edit, so it stayed.

HANS ZIMMER: Paperhouse - Overture
While I am not a very big Zimmer fan anymore, I was quite taken with this score when I first heard it, and I believe it to be one of his best works. This was the opening of the soundtrack album, which was heavily resequenced from the original film cues.

WENDY CARLOS & RACHEL ELKIND: The Shining - Main Theme
The original LP of this has never been issued on CD. I do have a decent quality rip of it, but I decided to go with the Silva Screen re-recording because I felt that it had better sound. I credit Hector Berlioz's 'Dies Irae' arrangement which Stanley Kubrick insisted on Carlos using after she insisted he listen to it.

GRAEME REVELL: Dead Calm - Breaking Free
And in terms of intensity, look no further than Revell's relentlessly oppressive score for this Phillip Noyce chiller. The source for this track was slightly damaged, and at one point one could hear the tape speed up and slow back down again. I made a very clean edit around this, but there is a slight ambience shift a few seconds later. Because it works with the music, I didn't bother changing it.

CHARLES BERNSTEIN: A Nightmare on Elm Street - The Man in the Hat
This track is made up of three cues; "Prologue," "Sleep Clinic" and "Terror in the Tub." I concentrated on that famous ten-note motif for Freddy Kreuger, but also tried to present a rounder picture of the score while keeping an overall structure to the track. The totally 80's amping up of final included cue leads straight into the next few tracks.

JAN HAMMER: Tales from the Crypt - Three's A Crowd
Here starts the suite of rock music. This was one of the less grisly episodes of this television series, and Hammer's contribution is based around this very Miami Vice style theme.

BRAD FIEDEL: Fright Night - Come To Me
This is the original soundtrack recording which I had on an early Silva compilation. This continues the "pop break" portion of the album.

JOHN CARPENTER & ALAN HOWARTH: They Live - End Title
And this continues with this propulsive Carpenter/Howarth track. I used the Silva re-recording.

TANGERINE DREAM: Firestarter - Flash Final
This is a transitionary track, from the "pop break" into the final, more extreme section of the album. While it retains many of the same textures as the "pop break," it also is more functional.

HANS ZIMMER: Paperhouse - Me and My Daughter, We Get On Like A House On Fire
This movie climaxes with a harsh nightmare, and this apocalyptic cue brings us fully into the last part, which is now about the engagement with the darkness. I feel that both thematically and texturally, this track was a good way to do this.

PHILIP GLASS: Candyman - Helen's Theme
While I certainly wanted to amp up the action towards the end, I did feel that the listener would need a chance to recover from the selection from Paperhouse, so I included this short piece from Glass' Candyman. Technically, this track doesn't fit on this album being as that it is acoustic, but I felt that it fit stylistically.

JOHN CARPENTER: Halloween - The Shape Stalks
...and stripping away everything and going for the visceral is what Carpenter does best, both in his movies and his films. Similarly, the music that represents the Michael Myers is as relentless as the character is.

MICHEL RUBINI & DENNY JAEGER: The Hunger - The Final Death
Now we're completely out of the realm of melodic music and into the experimental and grating sound collage for the fate of Miriam in this film, and explosion of textures.

GRAEME REVELL: Dead Calm - Reunited
I never thought I'd ever be saying this, but this track from Dead Calm is transitionary towards a more consonant sound.

JOHN MURPHY: 28 Days Later - In the House
Tension is all about possibility. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the world of film music, and this minimalist cue is an excellent illustration of that. The same motif repeats as the accompaniment changes and builds towards a thrilling climax.

THOMAS NEWMAN: The Lost Boys - Frogs on the Case
That climax comes in the form of this track, which is the heroic music heard for the protagonists' preparations for their final conflict with the vampires. This is actually edited from three parts, the first two from "Frogs on the Case" and the last from "Gotta Get Home." Newman uses a pipe organ as the primary soundbase with rock beats, and the track represents a synthesis of all the different sections of the disc, but is also a satisfying ending that brings the listener back to the real world.

Hopefully.
Tags: film music, my mixes, thomas newman
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