Joshua Gizelt (swashbuckler332) wrote,
Joshua Gizelt
swashbuckler332

  • Mood:
  • Music:

Assorted Nonsense

For some important information, see this. It may be very useful to you.

Waking Life


Long ago, before I put together my totally awesome audiophile home theater system, I had an Aiwa tower stereo with a timer on it. I was able to set it to wake me up. I usually used either Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here (I know it's a cliché, but it worked) or Mad Season's Above (the first song is called "Wake Up"). The alarm would go off when the time would come to actually get the hell out of bed and take a shower. This stereo is now the property of Brad.

Then I got the home theater. Now, I'm not going to trade the capacity for multichannel sound for movies and audiophile-quality music for a damn thing, but I did miss being able to set the timer.

Then I developed a dual clock system, before one of the clocks died. One was by my bed, and would go off first, and I could snooze it without getting up. The other was across the room. I had to get up to turn it off. When the one clock died, I put the clock that was left, I put that one across the room.

One of my gifts for Christmas was a new Timex alarm clock, which allowed me to reinstate the two clock system. The new clock has a very interesting buzzer. The thing beeps, but it is a double beep that slowly ramps up in volume. It is a very pleasant way to wake up.


Cold


The past few days have been so frickin' cold. It was quite cold in my apartment. I asked my landlord's wife to turn up the heat. "The heat is up," she responded. I checked the radiators... and she was right.

I was wondering why it was so damn cold until I passed in front of the window in my apartment with the air conditioner in it. I was blasted by frigid air.

Upon examination, I found that the accordian vent had busted, and tendrils of freezing atmosphere crept in and gradually turned my room into an ice cube.


"Lasers"


From the Daily Mislead
MISSION TO MARS FOR MILITARY BENEFIT, NOT JUST "SPIRIT OF DISCOVERY"


President Bush unveiled his proposal for a new space program Wednesday by invoking the spirit of explorers Lewis and Clark, saying, "They made that
journey in the spirit of discovery . . .America has ventured forth into space for the same reasons." But the president didn't mention that members of his administration view space as the next frontier for military buildup and conquest.

Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld chaired the Commission to Assess United States National Security Space Management and Organization four years ago, releasing its findings in January 2001. Rumsfeld's report found that "we know from history that every medium -- air, land and sea -- has seen conflict. Reality indicates that space will be no different." The panel also concluded that "given this virtual certainty, the [United States] must develop the means both to deter and to defend against hostile acts in and from space."

Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld chaired the Commission to Assess United States National Security Space Management and Organization four years ago. Rumsfeld was announced as Bush's choice for DoD Secretary weeks before the commission releasing its findings in January 2001. Rumsfeld's report found that "we know from history that every medium -- air, land and sea -- has seen conflict. Reality indicates that space will be no different." The panel also concluded that "given this virtual certainty, the [United States] must develop the means both to deter and to defend against hostile acts in and from space."

The president's focus on space exploration because it "improves our lives, and lifts our national spirit." However, behind the scenes, USA Today reported that Bush was persuaded to move forward in part due to the military benefits, as promoted to him by Vice President Cheney. The Center for American Progress' Progress Report yesterday noted an appearance by Republican Congressman Tom Feeney on Scarborough Country where he stated, "Somebody is going to dominate space. When they do, just like when the British dominated the naval part of our globe, established their empire, just like the United States has dominated the air superiority, ultimately, whoever is able to dominate space will be able to control the destiny of the entire Earth."

Feeney's comments echo PNAC's September 2000 report Rebuilding America's Defenses, which said, "Much as control of the high seas - and the protection of international commerce defined global power in the past, so will control of the new "international commons" be a key to world power in the future."

Proposed Space-Commie Death Device



Thomas Newman



I have started compiling a mix of film music by Tom Newman, who is my favorite composer of the Newman clan (father was Alfred, brother is David, uncle was Lionel, cousin is Randy). In doing so, I have pulled out and started listening his soundtrack albums. When I worked at Tower, I got a promo of his score from The War. For some reason, in the ten years since, I haven't managed to find the time to listen to it. I gave it a spin on the way home from work yesterday and found that it is a phenomenal score. I was inspired to listen to quite a few of his scores that I had only previously given a cursory listen to, including the sublime Oscar and Lucinda.

The result is that my single-disc mix has inflated to a three-disc set, one disc for each "mode" of his. One will be called "Kinky," the second will be called "Bittersweet" and the last will be called "Ghosts." I am really excited about the opportunity to do this type of overview.


Muse of Fire
Quality Control Bureau


In the restoration of Songs of the Heavens, there was an intermediate step which resulted in a version that had skipping through the last two tracks. This does not appear on the final master I created, but due to a labeling error, several burn copies were made. If you have one of the burn copies, let me know immediately.


'Allo, 'Allo


Now, listen carefully, because I am only going to say this once. My friend Raz has been showing me episodes of this Britcom. It is quite funny. It is set in France, during World War II. The protagonist is the proprietor of a café frequented by the Nazis that has been selected by the resistance as a relay point. The Gestapo is sniffing around, and everybody always threatens to shoot him. His primary worry is that his wife may find out that he's having an affair with one of the waitresses. His other major worry is that that waitress might find out about the affair he is conducting with the other waitress. What do you expect, he's French.

Tags: audio, cinema, film music, thomas newman
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Comments allowed for friends only

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 2 comments